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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  April 6, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's nine o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. in the next hour, a landmark court ruling on whether parents in england can take their children on holiday in term time. and i will be at the supreme court bringing you live reaction to that judgment. we are expecting it in the next hour. cuts to bereavement payments — something we've been talking about all week on the programme — come into effect today. we'll hear from a group of parents calling on the government to reverse the changes. and how to bounce back from massive disappointment. there is a head shot in the last second. olympic silver medallist lutalo mohammed, who missed out on a gold by one second, has been speaking to others about bouncing back from failure. we dropped from the darlings of the computer industry down to virtually zero. and that was a very, very tough time. hello, welcome to the programme.
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we're live until 11 o'clock this morning. we're also talking about free school meals this morning. the labour leader says if they win the election, they will tax private school fees and pay for all children in state primary schools to have free meals. let us know what you think of the idea. would it help you? or do you think there are better ways to spend the money? are you one of the parents paying school fees who would have to fund the policy? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live, and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... the supreme court will rule today on whether parents can take their children on holiday in term time, without breaking the law. it's considering the case ofjohn platt, who refused to pay a fine after taking his daughter to florida for a week in 2015. the decision could mean big changes for parents across england, as our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman reports
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in 2015, jon platt took his daughter out of school for a week's holiday. he was fined £120 by his local council on the isle of wight. he refused to pay, as his daughter was regularly attending school. she had a more than 90% attendance record. one in nine parents received a truancy penalty last year. that is a staggering number. that's a staggering number of people who received these fines last year. my assessment is that any unauthorised absence was a criminal offence, according to the isle of wight council. following concerns that some families saw term time holidays at cheaper prices as a right, rules came in in 2013, allowing local councils to fine a parent £60 per child, doubling to £120 if not paid within 21 days. but the fines did not stop a rise in absences. last year, more than 80,000 pupils in england missed one or more
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sessions of school for family holidays. -- 800,000. that is up more than 100,000 from the previous year. term—time holidays account for a quarter of sessions. the department for education says unauthorised absences damage life chances of children. this head teacher agrees. the chaos caused by a child missing for an extended period of time, three, four, five days, two weeks, can be huge. the impact will ripple on for months afterwards. think about it. if coming to school did not make a difference, we would not send them to school. the court case centres on what amounts to regular attendance at school. a win forjon platt would give parents more confidence to take their children on holiday during term—time, knowing they would not be breaking the law. clive coleman, bbc news. and you can seejon platt right now
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arriving at the supreme court to hear the ruling. he is the dad at the centre of this case. there he is outside having his photograph taken by members of the press. clive, this isa by members of the press. clive, this is a big dealfor parents, teachers and the department of education?m isa and the department of education?m is a huge deal. we know that parents head the fact if you take your child on holiday during the school holidays, you pay more money. there are many parents... in fact, ending and last year there were 800,000 children who missed school because they were taken on holiday by their pa rents they were taken on holiday by their parents during term time. it is a really big issue. the department of education argues that if you do that, you are damaging your child's chances at gcse level and indeed their life chances. parents on the other hand, like jon their life chances. parents on the other hand, likejon platt, argue that if their child is regularly attending, and his daughter had something like a 90% plus attendance
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record, then it is legitimate to be able to take the child on holiday during term time. what casually centres on is what amounts to regular attendance. and when that is looked at in terms of whether someone looked at in terms of whether someone has committed an offence, do you simply look at the holiday time? someone is taking a holiday for a week, clearly there cannot be regularly attending during that period. but if they have a good attendance records during the term itself, you could argue they are regularly attending. the court will determine what is regular attendance and what parents are allowed to do. we will be back with you as soon as thejudgment comes we will be back with you as soon as the judgment comes in. we will be back with you as soon as thejudgment comes in. we we will be back with you as soon as the judgment comes in. we are expecting it before ten o'clock. as $0011 expecting it before ten o'clock. as 50011 as expecting it before ten o'clock. as soon as it comes in, we would bring it alive. now the rest of the morning's news. the white house has issued a warning to russia over its support of the syrian regime, following chemical attacks which killed at least 72 people earlier this week. donald trump condemned the attacks
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as "an affront to humanity" — it comes ahead of his meeting with chinese president xi jinping in florida later today. labour says if it wins the next election, it'll provide every primary school pupil in england with a free school meal, by charging vat on private school fees. jeremy corbyn will say this morning that a labour government would invest in schools to ensure no child is held back because of their background. but the move has been criticised by the independent schools council, which claims the sums do not add up. the care quality commission is to release critical reports into four online pharmacies in england. concerns were raised by the coc about all four pharmacies. one pharmacy was found to employ a clinician who wasn't registered with the general medical council. another pharmacy has been suspended from registered practice. victoria will be discussing whether online pharmacies pose potential dangers later.
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a mother who went missing with her two young sons has been found safe, police say. samantha baldwin was last seen with six—year—old dylan and nine—year—old louis in nottingham on the 27th of march. nottinghamshire police said all three have been found and are with officers. there's a call for the drug ketamine to be used more widely by the nhs to treat depression. psychiatrists in oxford say they've had some success with a human trial using the class b substance, which is also used as a horse sedative. they're now calling for a national database to be established, so that doctors who prescribe it can monitor its results, from today, companies that employ more than 250 staff will be legally required to publish the average salaries they pay men and women. about half of the uk workforce will be affected by the new rules. if education secretaryjustine greening, who's also the minister for women and equalities, says the measures are being brought in to tackle the gender pay gap. there are many great companies in our country doing a fantasticjob
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of bringing through our female talent. we want to see more companies doing that, but we think transparencies on reporting on that pay gap is part of figuring out how that happens. pepsi has pulled its controversial new advert starring kendalljenner, after criticism that it was trying to commercialise protest movements like black lives matter. the company received thousands of complaints about the tone and the content of the advert, in whichjennerjoins a demonstration and gives a can of the soft drink to a police officer. pepsi says it was trying to project a "global message of unity, peace and understanding", and apologised for, in its words, "missing the mark". a headteacher at a us high school has resigned, after the student newspaper cast doubt on her qualifications. the investigation by six pittsburg high school students has been praised by usjournalists. the head teacher, amy robertson, said she had no comment in response to the questions about her credentials, saying "their concerns are not based on facts". a motorcyclist in australia
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had a lucky escape in an unusual traffic accident, when he was hit by a flying mattress. the drama was caught on cctv. the mattress flew off the back of a van, straight into the path of the unfortunate biker. thankfully, he managed to keep control — and the mattress did at least give him a soft landing. no—one was hurt in the incident. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more in half an hour. thank you very much. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live, and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now with jes. it looks like chelsea are going to win the premier league this year?|j think win the premier league this year?” think chelsea are definitely a step closer. they have one hand on the trophy, orfingertips at closer. they have one hand on the trophy, or fingertips at least. there remain seven points clear at the top of the premier league table after beating manchester city last
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night. after the shock defeat against crystal palace, they needed against crystal palace, they needed a big performance and that is what they got, particularly from eden hazard, who scored his 15th and 16th goals of the season. antonio conte thinks they need six wins from their last eight games. they have struggling sunderland and middlesbrough still to play. it should be possible. but they have to go to manchester united and everton. they could be potential hurdles. if you look of the way they play, chelsea are hard to break down and know how to grind out a win. it certainly looks as though they may be on for another premier league title. amazing scenes at newcastle last night with a referee who didn't know the rules. what was going on?” don't think anybody knew what was going on. it was chaos. this is newcastle, pushing for promotion back into the premier league. they are at home to burton. they knew a win would take them back to the top
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of the championship. matt ritchie, the newcastle midfielder, was given a penalty which he converted. but the referee was not happy. he feels that one of the newcastle players was in the box whilst the penalty was in the box whilst the penalty was being taken. instead, as eve ryo ne was being taken. instead, as everyone would expect, for the referee to command a retake, he gave burton and indirect free kick. cue absolute pandemonium in the stadium. 50,000 fans incensed, not knowing what was happening, when the referee had given the decision. look of the referee. newcastle manager rafa benitez absolutely incensed, questioning the referee. very unusually, this hardly ever happens, the referee ruling body released a statement to set the rules of the game have been misapplied. the referee has apologised. i am sure he was relieved to see matt ritchie score, newcastle win and return to
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the top of the championship macro. crazy scenes. and it looks like the favourite for the masters could be out after falling down the stairs? yes, a freak accident for dustin johnson. he is the world number one. he has won the last three tournaments he has been involved in. this is the biggest event on the golfing calendar. he has taken a fall down the stairs and injured his lower back. this was in the house he is renting during the tournament in augusta. his manager says he is resting he is on a of anti—inflammatories with a hope of still playing. he was the favourite to win. that is seriously in doubt now. back injuries are notoriously complicated for golfers, one of the worst injuries you can suffer. in his favour, he does have one of the later to times. he doesn't tee off onto three minutes past seven this evening. fingers crossed for him. thank you. more sport later. good
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morning. welcome to the programme. today is the day that cuts made by the government to bereavement payments come in. it's also the day a coalition of charities is setting up a taskforce to try to fight the changes. from today, any parent who loses their spouse or civil partner will be able to claim a maximum of 18 months of financial support — that's down from 20 years. it also includes an increase in the initial lump sum from £2000 to £3500, and people without children will also benefit for the first time. on tuesday, we spoke to alan — not his real name — who has incurable cancer, and has been told he has months to live. he told us he's worked out that if he died before the changes came in, his wife and two children would have received up to 60,000. now they will they receive, he says, up to £6000. at this point, it wasn't life, you're contemplating death, and you want to go out of this world with some dignity, with some grace, with some peace of mind,
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not full of financial anxiety, feeling as if the government has just taken money away from you. this case was raised in the house of lords on tuesday. can i urge the minister to talk to his ministerial collea g u es minister to talk to his ministerial colleagues so that the government can display understanding and humanity, and allow this brave young man to pass peacefully from this world, with dignity, in the knowledge that the financial future of his children is taking care of? cani of his children is taking care of? can i first say to my noble friend how sorry i am to hear about this case of this young man. and to offer
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my sympathies both to him and his family. i appreciate the urgency and i understand that this person may not have long to live. i shall certainly speak to colleagues as sooi'i certainly speak to colleagues as 50011 as certainly speak to colleagues as soon as humanly possible and come back to him with information on the situation. for the third day running, we asked for someone from the department for work and pensions to talk to us today, to explain the reforms on the day they come in. they declined. they gave us the statement they sent us on tuesday and wednesday. conservative peer lord pollock the
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sphere and also with us, be sphere and n brooks—dutton, an author, award—winning blogger and widow who lost his wife a year after they married, leaving him to raise their two—year—old alone. georgia elms is a campaigner for the widowed and young charity, who was pregnant with her daughter when her husband, jonathan, died suddenly of meningitis age 38. and in warwick, beth and eight—year—old sam. beth has asked us not use her surname. she was left to bring up two boys when her husband, duncan, died of an undiagnosed heart condition while playing football four years ago. welcome all of you. thank you for coming on the programme. i will talk to beth and sam. good morning to you. morning. good morning. beth, the payments you received, how much did you need them and how much the due continued to use them?” did you need them and how much the due continued to use them? i was very fortu nate due continued to use them? i was very fortunate that my husband duncan worked for a very large engineering firm, and we have a good pension. however when i realised
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that myjob was no longer tenable because i travel round the county area because i travel round the county are a lot for work as a teacher, travelling around different schools, and when i and a five—year—old as a single parent, i had to give up that job. when i went back to work, took ona job. when i went back to work, took on a job that required me to take a pay drop of nine tenths of our salary so all of a sudden our income was virtually halved. consequently there was very difficult to deal with, so the widowed parents allowa nce with, so the widowed parents allowance allowed us to be able to do the things we used to do before duncan died and i think that is important that our standard of living has remained roughly the same but mainly because of his pension. the widowed parents allowance just gives us a little extra to make sure we are able to go out and enjoy life as much as we can give on our new circumstances. let me ask you this, beth, because some of our audience do, do you think it is fair that other taxpayers should pay to the allowa nce other taxpayers should pay to the allowance you have been receiving
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when you do have duncan's pension.” think it is very important to be clear that the widowed parents allowa nce clear that the widowed parents allowance is based on duncan's national insurance contributions, so he paid in with his employer approximately £100,000 over the time he was working forjaguar land rover, semester that would have come back to him in his state pension, and obviously he is not going to be able to claim that now, having not live long enough to do so. so although it is seen as a benefit, it is actually an allowance based on his national insurance contributions, so the way that other people claim their state pension, it should be fair that we claim this to help the boys do what they would be able to have done otherwise. sam connor you have written a letter, who is it too? to mr wight. who is that? our mp. anything you are happy to read us a bit of your letter?
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yes. go ahead, in your own time. dear yes. go ahead, in your own time. deaerwight, i yes. go ahead, in your own time. deaerwight, lam yes. go ahead, in your own time. dear mr wight, i am writing to inform you that reducing the money of the widowed will" panic and worry. the widowed panic putt allowa nce, worry. the widowed panic putt allowance, we think it is unfair that you are taking it away after 18 months. my daddy died when i was five and my brother tom was three. the money my mother has received has helped considerably. mummy would be more stressed. wpa means that mum can still do my drop—offs and pick—ups at school. she can talk to my teacher if i am feeling sad or poorly. i look forward to a huge cuddle if i have had a bad day. i sometimes still feel flooded with sadness nearly four years later. i was to have stated when my daddy died and others will be too. they deserve to treated better when this tragedy hits them. sam, that is so
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moving, thank you for reading that. i willjust talk moving, thank you for reading that. i will just talk to moving, thank you for reading that. i willjust talk to our guests in the studio. you are doing a great job of listening i know you can't see us job of listening i know you can't see us will stop lord pollock, first of all, the one and sam was mike case, duncan died four years ago. as other people have said this week, grief does not simply last 18 months or it is how long the financial support be from today. absolutely, thatis support be from today. absolutely, that is why i am absolutely convinced it should work on the children. in other words while the children. in other words while the children are in school or in full—time education, the money should be there to ensure they would be able to do, exactly as sam said, or as sam's mother said, so do the things he was able to do before. sam is not the only one who has written a letter, you have too. i have, with some colleagues house of lords we delivered a letter to the secretary of state, damian green, last night.
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the work and pensions secretary. after i raised, and you saw the clip, and... do you know him personally? damian green? i have known damian for 30 years. so it is not that you are both conservatives come you actually have a connection with him? yes, i know him and i was prepared to write a letter to him because he was not involved actually when this was being discussed. when you go from a theoretical bill to now, today, the act becomes law, and now, today, the act becomes law, and now we are into the practical. i don't think anybody had intended when writing the bill and discussing the bill the consequences of what we have seen what you have been sharing all week. but that is theirjob. when you write new laws come you have to look at the outcomes of peoples lives. is very difficult and different going from theoretical to
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the practical. now we have an opportunity, that is why we have written this letter, to say this is a serious problem. i know myself, my wife is a very close friend of the wife is a very close friend of the wife of alan and katie, and i had a first cousin who died in her 30s, two years after her husband died and left two young daughters to be brought up by grandparents, so i understand it. without attacking government, but we can say the government, but we can say the government there is a solution, and damian green does not have a callous or cruel bone in his body. and i think that given all of the campaigns from people, i think there may be a solution to be found. which is? which is to work on the children, and hopefully he will see that children are the most important, and whilst they are in education, full—time education, this can be looked at. and he has the ability with his other ministers, who i now also very well, to discuss
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this now. it is not finished. even though it is law, we can give solutions. so you can extend the 18 months. that is what i would like to do, and we do have 18 months, it is not something that has to be done today, because anybody who is receiving this money will continue for the next 18 months. ben, what you think about the changes?m for the next 18 months. ben, what you think about the changes? it has been very difficult to deal with over the past couple of weeks. i was in the film that rio ferdinand made, andl in the film that rio ferdinand made, and i think what people saw, white awareness is up and i think what people saw, white awareness is up so and i think what people saw, white awareness is up so much is that they got a glimpse of what it is like for a family to be bereaved. can we just play that clip, you are in the kitchen with loads of other dads and it is very moving. how are you doing? nice to meet you. i remember going to my wife's funeral and everyone said, "just be strong, you're doing so well, you're doing so well." and you think... on reflection, i thought, "i'm not, i'm in shock." i was diagnosed with depression about two years in.
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i was struggling to get out of bed. i was struggling to be the dad that my son needed me to be. and then i realised that, actually, i was depressed before that, i was just depressed in a very active way. i got a lot of stuff done, like i was able to run a marathon, write a book, do all of this stuff. i was productive. grief gets you at some point. so what you as a viewer would have seen so what you as a viewer would have seenin so what you as a viewer would have seen in that film is rio eventually being able to start to talk to his children about their grief, but relief of the first time about the 18 month mark, where today the support would stop. now obviously he isa support would stop. now obviously he is a wealthy man, but before that are struggling, it is not a linear process, it is not like it ends. i think what has been happening re ce ntly think what has been happening recently is it has been very hard for other charities to get people to
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really care, because they have not been able to really engage. people have not been able to engage at that level and this programme has given them the opportunity to do that, and all the programming you have done this week. what we are asking for as pa rt of this week. what we are asking for as part of this task force is for people to maintain that, social, we have created a series of videos that people can share so that people can really get an insight into what it is like. i won't speak for georgia, she has her own very powerful story about this that we keep hearing time and time again about how actually children's grief ebbs and flows. and also as parents of grieved children, we are kind of grieving for more than one person. i find we are kind of grieving for more than one person. ifind now we are kind of grieving for more than one person. i find now that i am in quite a good place but my son has onlyjust turn. he was two and his mum was killed, he has onlyjust got back to grips with what death is. i got back to grips with what death is. lam got back to grips with what death is. i am struck, and one in the morning i have a very happy child that can't go to school, and then at
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the school gates i have a very melancholy child who feels he is the only person there who has not got a month. it is very hard to deal with. i have completely changed my life, cut my working hours, think most people need those choices that is thatis people need those choices that is that is what is stopping today, that choice that to continue. but i am hopeful we can make a change through this task force, because like you say, we have 18 months to make this change happen. they doesn't need to be the end and we don't want to. georgia, hello, you had a good job with mars, which i think you had to give up. so how would you have coped without the widowed parents allowa nce ? without the widowed parents allowance? i would have had to go back to work full—time. allowance? i would have had to go back to work full-time. what impact would that have had?” back to work full-time. what impact would that have had? i would not have been around for my children. as i say, my husband died on the wednesday, and then on the thursday i found out i was pregnant with my second daughter. so with the 18 months, she would still have been a baby when i would have been having
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to replace my husband's income. and thatis to replace my husband's income. and that isjust not fair on my children. also as ben said about grief coming, both my children daisy and scarlet did not understand death until they were six or seven. i had to be available to take them to bereavement counselling, to pick them up from school, because they we re them up from school, because they were scared i was not going to pick them up, because daddy had died, that might happen to me. you can't bea that might happen to me. you can't be a mum or that might happen to me. you can't bea mum ora that might happen to me. you can't be a mum ora parent if that might happen to me. you can't be a mum or a parent if you are not there for your children, and be a mum or a parent if you are not there foryour children, and i be a mum or a parent if you are not there for your children, and i could not have done that with myjob. there for your children, and i could not have done that with my job. you know what the government says about this. first of all there are changes which, for example, widows, widowers who don't have children will benefit for the first time, they have increased the initial lump sum, tax—free etc. they also say it is updating a really old—fashioned system when women did not work, they would rely solely on their husbands
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income, and those days are gone because so many women work. what would you say to that? £500 a month is not the second income. we're not saying it is replacing being come, it isjust saying it is replacing being come, it is just enabling saying it is replacing being come, it isjust enabling you to go part—time to be able to be there for the —— not replacing the income. if they wanted to update it, then why are they not including parents who are they not including parents who are not married? last year, 50% of children were born to people who we re children were born to people who were not married. those children are not being supported this way. this is why i say that we should concentrate on the children. that would cover that situation. i don't believe that anybody intended this, andi believe that anybody intended this, and i think that now we are in the practical situation of the law being as it is, i think that without intemperance language that government and damian green and his department will look at these things. as i say, all parties and
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groups in the lords, the front bench from labour, from the liberal democrats and the bishops, have all come in to support. there is another question this morning at 11 o'clock in the house of lords being put down. with the right pressure, concentrating on this issue, because there are lots of issues today, but if we concentrate on this issue, i think that we have a chance of having somebody like damien, who is empathetic, sympathetic and i think we'll look at it carefully. 0k, thank you very much. we will see and we will continue to report on this. thank you, lord pollock, ben, georgia, ten one and sam connor you area star, georgia, ten one and sam connor you are a star, thank you for coming on our programme. your views are welcome. still to come — how do you recover from failure? lutalo mohammed — who missed on gold by one second in the rio oympics — has been finding out.
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and the increasing criticism of online pharmacies. how lax standards could be compromising patient safety. now the latest news headlines. the supreme court will rule today on whether parents can take their children on holiday in term time, without breaking the law. it's considering the case ofjon platt, who was given a fine of £120 when he took his daughter away for a week on an unauthorised term—time holiday to floriday in 2015. the white house has issued a warning to russia over its support of the syrian regime, following chemical attacks which killed at least 72 people earlier this week. donald trump condemned the attacks as "an affront to humanity" — it comes ahead of his meeting with chinese president xi jinping in florida later today. european council president donald
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tusk will meet theresa may in downing street later today. he is expected to be discussing the way ahead on brexit, one week after he set out draft guidelines for negotiations. labour says if it wins the next election, it'll provide every primary school pupil in england with a free school meal, by charging vat on private school fees. jeremy corbyn will say this morning that a labour government would invest in schools to ensure no child is held back because of their background. but the move has been criticised by the independent schools council, which claims the sums do not add up. the care quality commission is to release critical reports into four online pharmacies in england. concerns were raised by the coc about all four pharmacies. one pharmacy was found to employ a clinician who wasn't registered with the general medical council. another pharmacy has been suspended from registered practice. a mother who went missing with her two young sons has been found safe, police say.
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samantha baldwin was last seen with six—year—old dylan and nine—year—old louis in nottingham on the 27th of march. nottinghamshire police said all three have been found and are with officers. that is a summary of the latest news. more at ten o'clock. thanking you. a couple of comments on the last discussion. emma tweets that it isa last discussion. emma tweets that it is a disgrace taking money from a bereaved family. losing a farm —— pa rent bereaved family. losing a farm —— parent is bad enough. kirsty says, i hope your item will include a discussion on the fact and unmarried person receives no such benefit. my partner died in 2011 and i have not received a penny from the state, despite the fact we were considered a couple by the state when it suited them for tax credits. and my partner paid national insurance on to. it is a disgrace. john has less sympathy.
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what differences there between a single—parent family and a bereaved family? benefits can't be based on emotions but fairness. now the sport. good morning. a busy night in the premier league. chelsea manager antonio conte says his side need 6 wins from their last 8 games to win the premier league. chelsea remain seven points clear at the top of the table, after a 2—1 win against manchester city — edin hazard with both goals. nearest rivals spurs secured a late win against swansea. at the bottom of the table, a huge win for hull, who've now climbed out of the relegation zone for the first time since october. they came from behind to beat relegation rivals middlesborough 4—2. the body which represents referees have apologised after keith stroud's error last night where he failed to instruct newcastle to retake a penalty against burton after players from both sides encroached into the area. stroud wrongly awarded burton a free—kick instead. dustinjohnson will decide later today if he's fit enough
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to play in the masters. the world number one fell down the stairs of his rented home yesterday and injured his back. that is all these board for now. —— the sport. coming up... we'll be live at the supreme court shortly as they rule on whether parents can take their children on holiday in term time, without being fined. this is just this isjust going this is just going to affect parents in england. it is a big deal. we will bring you that ruling when it comes in. you've trained your whole life. every single day, month after month, year after year, to win at the olympics. you are one second away from winning the gold medal. and it all goes wrong. it happened to tae kwon do athlete lutaylo muhammad last summer in rio. beaten in the very last second of his fight with his opponent from the ivory coast, he was inconsolable in picking up silver instead. he broke down on tv and apologised to the nation. so how do you cope with failure,
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bounce back from defeat? lutalo wanted to make a film exclusively with us as he comes to terms with life after rio and speak to other people who've had to pick themselves up after being knocked back in life. i'm lutalo muhammad. i've been to two olympic games and i've won two medals for team gb in taekwondo, a bronze and a silver, but they are not the ones i wanted. last year, i made it to the final. something i've been working my entire life for. i came within a second of completing my dream... commentator: he is one second away. ..of winning an olympic gold medal. then this happened. lutalo muhammad closes down, blocks and there is a head shot in the last second. i'm so sorry for the people who stayed up late to watch and cheer me on. i let them down at the last second. so, how do i come back from that? how does anyone come back from devastating failure? ifelt like a failure because the one job that you're meant to do is keep your child safe and protect them for
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the full nine months. i felt like a success and within literally six months, i had gone from that to putting the company into liquidation. i had a failure, but, you know, you have to move on. it has been more than six months since the games in rio. i am back in training at gb taekwondo's base in manchester, but looking back at the olympic final still hurts. good to see you, man. how are you? my friend and team—mate, mahama cho, was with me in the hours after i lost the final in rio. irememberthe dying seconds because i thought there is no possible way you're going to lose this fight. i was already celebrating. i was like, he did it, it is done. he has got the gold that he has been looking for. and when it was taken away, really and truly, i could not sleep until i could actually see you to speak to you.
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i was literally waiting for you to get home and when you got home, ijust knocked on the door to see how you was and it was sad. it felt like a stab in the heart, a little bit, because, obviously, the training you went through, the trials and tribulations to get there, the one phrase you used a lot was... your dad told you you were actually a prime age to go and take the title. i believed it. for it to be taken away in the dying second was heartbreaking. after the olympics, i didn't notify wanted to carry on in the sport, so i came to the sports psychologist dr amanda owens. it is hard to put into words how disappointed i am,
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iam i am proud i contributed to team gb's record—breaking tally but it should have been a gold medal. watching that now, does all the raw emotion come back? can you go back there? yeah, it does come back. can't watch that without feeling those same emotions. sorry. it's tough to watch because it takes me back there, that feeling of devastation, that feeling of, i've come so close to accomplishing what was my life goal and to have it snatched away, literally at the last second, it is tough. how long did it take you to deal with and accept that you came this close to winning the gold medal? what have you learned from this experience? it taught me, i think, a lot about myself. the initial period was horrible.
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the next day waking up having to do the media, the interviews. it was therapeutic in a way because i was getting to talk about it, voice my feelings. but admittedly, the good times really came when i got off the plane and arrived back in the uk. you come out of the whole olympic bubble. you have no idea what is going on back home. to receive the reception i received from the british public was absolutely outstanding. they cried with me. i want them to cry tears ofjoy next time. someone whose failures than successes have been lived out in the public eye for decades is businessman lord sugar. who better to come to for advice on moving on? there was a time in the computer industry where we were king
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of the computer market in europe and we made a bad range of products that had technical faults on them and we struggle to the understand what the technical faults were. in that period of time, we dropped from the darlings of the computer industry down to virtually zero. that was a very, very tough time, very, very tough time. from making profits of £160 million a year to losses of 70 million. big bank debts and things like that. that was a very, very tough time. my personal experience, i lost at the olympics in the last second. one of the hardest things to deal with was knowing that the entire world was watching. in your experience, how do you deal with that? how do you overcome that? failure or something that went wrong, it is not a good thing. but it is factually correct.
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it was not a nice time, but you just have to deal with it. you can't deal with it by arguing against it or making excuses because it is factually right. we had a failure. i had a failure and people talked about my failure and all that stuff. but, you know, you have to move on until you get your next product in the marketplace, like our satellite dishes, and then suddenly, everything else was forgotten. did that criticism... do you think it helps you in any way? it helped in the sense that you take no notice of it and it is like the old thing, it is like yesterday's newspaper, really. our cousins in america have got a new president who does not seem to have learnt that lesson which i am absolutely surprised about. he seems to react to every bit of criticism that is thrown at him whereas he should not,
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really, he should just let it water off a duck‘s back. brilliant. so, all i have to do is win that gold medal and everything's forgotten. exactly. and you know how to do that. yes, sir. but for some people, feeling like a failure can have more damaging consequences than olympic silver medal. this is the furniture that i used to import. naomi gilmore ran a garden furniture company worth almost £1 million. until suddenly, things started going wrong. i think my lowest point came about six months after my highest point. i remember going to see my bank manager, turned over nearly £1 million in business, i really thought i had made it. i had a team of staff, premises everything seemed to be going really, really well. i remember sitting there, just couldn't believe that i had made it all and i had created this growth. within a six—month period, to go from that to literally
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bailiffs knocking on my door one night to come and take my car away. my kids were just about to go to bed and they were just screaming and devastated and i sat on the kitchen floor and to be honest just felt like my soul had been ripped out. it wasjust kind of like, i can't get my kids to school, i've let them down, and ijust felt like a huge failure. did you feel like a failure because you felt like you had let down the people around you? the people most important to you? yeah. i felt like a failure myself. i was annoyed with myself. how i did not see stuff coming. i was questioning all the time. then i think i went into people judging the mode and felt quite scared wanted to hide away and just pretend it was not all happening. paloma thompson has two healthy happy boys.
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winter is four and bodhi is two. but winter was born premature and has some learning difficulties. for a long time, paloma felt like this was her fault. ifelt like a failure because i think when you are pregnant one job that you meant to do is keep your child safe and protect them for the full nine months so that they are born on time and there wasn't any medical reason or issue with him or myself for him to come early. just my body let him down and ifailed to do my job and protect him. when you see that tiny body, no bigger than your hand, and all of the wires coming out. he had a cannula in his leg for antibiotics, he had a cannula drip in his umbilical cord for caffeine. he was on a ventilator.
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all wires to monitor blood pressure, pulse, oxygen levels, and then the uv lamp for the jaundice. he is inside the incubator and you cannot touch him, you cannot cuddle him, say everything is going to be ok. it is just a really awful feeling that i've let my child down and now he has had to start life in a really difficult place. how long did you feel like that? definitely for the first year of his life and i found it really difficult to talk to people about it as well because there was always this sense of you just need to try and be happy and concentrate on him getting better. it is not really about him being ok and happy, it is more about i feel like i've really let him down. so how did naomi and paloma overcome feeling like failures? naomi now runs an online marketing company. in those days, i think
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it was all about turnover and money and premises and growing the business. i think now very much i have a successful business but i have a lot of balance in my life. i am a single mum, i have two girls, i adore my girls and i am able to work and have success at work but i am also a success as a mother too. i really feel that i do have that balance in my life. do you feel like a failure now? i absolutely don't feel like a failure now. i certainly did feel like a failure at the time but now i feel like a success. around that time, i feltjudged and now i don't feeljudged. it is really about me focusing on my own stuff, the stuff i love, in terms of me achieving my own success, whatever that is defined as. paloma was diagnosed with a form of postnatal depression and has been seeing a therapist. she has alsojoined a group of mums with similar feelings. what is your relationship like with your children now?
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wonderful. absolutely wonderful. it is strange now when i look at winter and to think that at one point ijust felt like i had no connection with him because i didn't feel like i was worthy of being his mum because i felt so guilty about it. i have been lucky to reach the top of my sport, but the higher you get, the further the fall. it took me a while to appreciate silver but now i can look back on it as a positive. bring on the 2020 games in tokyo, where my next medal will be gold. and lutalo will be here with me in the studio just after 10.30. really, really interested to you to
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give me your own stories of how you bounced back from a disappointment orafailure, bounced back from a disappointment or a failure, whatever it may be, and we will feed that into the conversation with lutalo muhammad after ten past ten. inside the supreme court right now, we have judges who are delivering their ruling in the case of dared john platt, who is arguing it is not illegal if he takes his daughter out of school in term time. this is a really significant case, it will affect parents really significant case, it will affect pa rents in really significant case, it will affect parents in england, they are going for thejudgment affect parents in england, they are going for the judgment now which means any second now we will find out if dad john platt has won or lost. as soon as we know for sure, because they build up to it, these judges, they know how to create a sense of drama. it means we may interrupt our next, session, which is about online pharmacies. a number of online pharmacies in england have been criticised for lax standards that could compromise patient safety. the official health watchdog, the care quality commission, has called for improvements at four
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providers, afterfinding a number of shortcomings, including prescriptions approved without enough checks into patient history, a lack of communication with the patient‘s gp, and large volumes of asthma inhalers dispensed at once. faye kirkland is a working gp and one of our health reporters. so, how do the online ‘s sites offer it? mostly patients go in and fill ina simple it? mostly patients go in and fill in a simple online form, you ask basic questions like your date of birth, how much you weigh, you'll blood pressure, and that gets reviewed by a doctor. and then they decide whether to prescribe, based on that information. there are also sites that offer skype and mobile apps as well. how are they regulated? by the care quality commission in england, and last month they produced clear outlines of what they should expect when they are inspected by them. but in the different parts of the uk there are different parts of the uk there are different regulators. so they are inspected in a slightly different way. any concerns about that? the royal pharmaceutical society is rarely concerned about that, because
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england is the only place where there are clear standards for online providers. theoretically providers could move their headquarters to the other parts of the uk and not be inspected so robustly. what should be but watch out for if they are buying online? it is difficult. the cqc sale or where the site is registered, do they have a cqc logo? they say if you're going to buy online, do it with caution, make sure you know the risks and benefits of anything that you buy. thank you very much. let's talk now to professor steve field, the chief inspector of general practice at the care quality commission. helen webbereley is a gp who works for two of the sites mentioned in the coc report. stuart gale is the managing director of frosts pharmacy ltd, which operates the oxford online pharmacy, another company criticised by the health watchdog. welcome all of you. we may interrupt for some breaking news from the supreme court, so i apologise in
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advance in case we do. professor field, thank you for talking to us, it is the first time the cqc, your organisation, has inspected these websites. why do it now, what has pumped of this? i am a gps ball is being chief inspector of general practice, this is part of our ongoing programme in of regulating any —— what has prompted this. regulating any provider, whether health or social care. we havejust completed our programme of all general practices in england, and we are looking at online providers. what worries you most? we found that so what worries you most? we found that so far we have issued six reports. at times, these providers are not prescribing appropriately. there are not the basic checks to make sure the patient they providing for is that patient. they are not taking a comp rancid medical history, including what other this patients are on. i as a gp chief inspector
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would expect that the standards are the same as if you went into a general practice anywhere inning on. the point that faye raised, if somebody, or if you suspend a website operating out of england, what is to stop the website popping up what is to stop the website popping up in scotland, wales, except? faye has been great at highlighting these issues and she is absolute right. i am responsible, and cqc, the regulator, is responsible for sites in england for patients in england. we are aware of sites that are operating outside england, and patients can access prescriptions that way as well. so we are meeting with the other regulators within the uk, wales, scotland and northern ireland, and we are communicating with others in europe and elsewhere. so we are trying to pass information on. helen weatherly, thank you for coming on, your roles of the online
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surgery coming on, your roles of the online surgery and the online oxford pharmacy. professor philip is not report says that when patients were requested prescriptions of the online surgery it took as little as 17 seconds for prescriptions to be approved. that can't be right, can it? we need to look at this very clear. we reviewed all of the patient still with on the online surgery. patient still with on the online surgery. the 17 second one that seems to have hit the highlight is a repeat prescription, so actually, i am an nhs discussion as well, —— nhs gp as well, it is the same there. so no checks are needed for a repeat perception? online i would argue it is safer, because i have a computer screen is safer, because i have a computer screen that shows me a full medical history, all of the medication that person is taking and it is completely up—to—date because they have just given me that information. whereas in a gp surgery they are six months old. you are saying you can doa months old. you are saying you can do a repeat description in 17 seconds having checked the patient was like medical history? yes. i
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would never prescribe anything that was not safe, but there are instances where you can check that a repeat medication is safe for somebody in the 17 seconds that they are bandying about the moment. somebody in the 17 seconds that they are bandying about the momentm somebody in the 17 seconds that they are bandying about the moment. it is not bandying about, it happens, and you say it is fine. on the case that iexamined, you say it is fine. on the case that i examined, that retreat di repeat prescription was fine. and actually, victoria, if you look of the patient that used the services, we have a delighted cohort of patients. there has never been an instance of any harm coming to patients. still, you have been criticised by this cqc, two of the site you work for. stuart gale, the cqc found that frost pharmacy ltd was prescribing large quantities of inhalers for asthma without checking if the patient was my condition was either out of control or if a diagnosis has been confirmed. the cqc has issued you with warning notices about that, is that fair enough? absolutely, yes.
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why was it happening? we were talking about probably five to ten patients that have had more inhalers than would be normally appropriate in an nhs setting. so we have spoken to these patients, and actually they wa nt to these patients, and actually they want convenience. 45% of them... to these patients, and actually they want convenience. 4596 of them. .. you didn't know if some of them had asthma. yes, we did, because that was part of the process, we would know that they had asthma, 78% of them had had an annual asthma review with their own them had had an annual asthma review with theirown gp, them had had an annual asthma review with their own gp, but 45% of them could not get into their gp. see why saying it is all right, so i am wondering why the cqc issued you with warning notices if everything is fine? we are a stream they have you with the cqc doing this because ultimately safety is another one priorities and we have no argument with the cqc. we think the whole process was excellent, our inspectors were very thorough. you
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are glad to be issued with warning notices. threw to be inspected and given the chance to improve. i am going to pause there, as inspected, we have the roaring from the supreme court but i am very grateful for your time. court but i am very grateful for yourtime. —— court but i am very grateful for your time. —— the ruling. john platt, the dad who took this case to court, it affects parents in england. he argued, and it has gone to the highest court in the land, he argued that parents were not breaking the law when they took their children out of school during term time. john platt has lost his case, that is the breaking news in the last minute. john platt has lost his case in the supreme court, it means local authorities can continue to find parents who take their children out of school. let's go live —— can continue to fined pa rents. live —— can continue to fined parents. they will be breaking the law, parents who do this? absolutely. this is a ruling that will upset a lot of parents. it will delight schools and local
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authorities, because it is absolutely crystal clear. this case was all about what amounts to regular attendance at a school, and in the court below, john platt had argued successfully that because his daughter generally had a very good attendance record, over 90%, he argued that she was regularly attending school. even if he was to ta ke attending school. even if he was to take her out of school for a whole week of holiday. lady hale who gave thejudgment of week of holiday. lady hale who gave the judgment of the court effectively drove a coach and horses through that. what she said is that there are two protect the re—interpretations of what regular attendance means, it either means sufficiently frequently on the one hand, which is howjohn platt had argued it in the courts below and how it had been interpreted in the courts below, or it means in accordance with the school's attendance policy, and she came down very firmly in favour of interpreting it in that way, that regular attendance means in
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accordance with the school's attendance policy, and most schools of course will have a 100% attendance policy. she said that unauthorised absences have a disruptive effect not only on the education of the individual child but also on the work of other pupils and their teachers. if one pupil can be taken out whenever it suits the pa rents, be taken out whenever it suits the parents, then so can others. she said different pupils may be taken out at different times, multiplying the disruptive effect. any education system expects people to come and keep to the rules. not to do so is unfairto keep to the rules. not to do so is unfair to those obedient parents who do keep to the rules, whatever the cost or inconvenience to themselves. so this is a very, firm very ruling from the supreme court that you must obey the attendance rules of the school that your child goes to, and if they say you cannot take your child out for a week's holiday, two weeks holiday, then you can't do that without risking having a fine,
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and if you don't pay that tamme one, being prosecuted. —— that fine, being prosecuted. —— that fine, being prosecuted. —— that fine, being prosecuted. john platt's case will now go back to the magistrates‘ court and he will have two face this charge of failing to secure the regular attendance of his daughter at school. it is a unanimous judgment of all five justices, you must obey the schools on attendance. we will be back with you after the news and sport to get reaction, because you may be able to speak to john platt, as he emerges from the supreme court, because he was therefore that ruling. your reaction welcome. if you are a parent of children, whether you have taken them out of school in term time for a holiday or not, what is your reaction to this very significant ruling? let me know. it is ten o‘clock, iambic tory adoption. within the past few minutes, the supreme court has ruled that jon platt, the father who took his daughter out of school to go on holiday, should not have done so.
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unauthorised absences have a disruptive effect, not only on the education of the individual child, but also on the work of other pupils and their teachers. in his first british tv interview, we‘ll be speaking to dallas, the son of kurt cochran — who was killed in the westminster terror attack two weeks ago. you can see the full interview later — as he‘s told us he doesn‘t want to think about the terrorist who carried out the attack. i have seen little pictures here and there but i have chosen to avoid looking into whatever his story was. it's looking into whatever his story was. it‘s not going to help me any knowing who it was or why he did it. also — we‘ll be speaking to lutalo mohammad — who missed out on gold by one second at the rio olympics. he‘s been finding out about turning failure into success. i won two medels 13 i won two medels13j.b. in tae kwon
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do. —— team gb. they are not the ones i wanted. now the latest news. in the last few minutes, the father who refused to pay a fine after taking his daughter out of school for a non—authorised holiday, has lost his case at the supreme court. jon platt was fined when he took his daughter away for a week in florida during term time. he refused to pay because he said his daughter‘s attendance record was very good. the supreme court has overturned a high courtjudgment, saying supreme court has overturned a high court judgment, saying it supreme court has overturned a high courtjudgment, saying it was disruptive to children‘s education to ta ke disruptive to children‘s education to take them out of school. unauthorised absences have a disruptive effect. not only on the education of the individual child, but also on the work of other pupils and of their teachers. if one pupil
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can be taken out whenever it suits the parent, then so can others. different pupils might be taken out at different times, multiplying the disruptive effect. any educational system expects people to keep the rules. not to do so is unfair to those obedient parents who do keep the rules, whatever the cost or inconvenience to themselves. we will be getting more on that ruling shortly. we are expecting to hear the reaction ofjon platt and more detailfrom clive hear the reaction ofjon platt and more detail from clive coleman. the european council president, donald tusk, will meet theresa may at downing street at midday today. they are expected to discuss the uk's they are expected to discuss the uk‘s exit from the european union a week after mr tusk said the guidelines for negotiations. the white house has issued a warning to russia over its support of the syrian regime, following the deaths of at least 72 people in what‘s believed to be a chemical attack. president trump condemned the deaths as "an affront to humanity". his comments come ahead of his meeting with chinese president xijinping in florida
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today. a mother who went missing with her two young sons has been found safe, police say. samantha baldwin was last seen with six—year—old dylan and nine—year—old louis in nottingham on the 27th of march. nottinghamshire police say all three have been found, and are with officers. labour says if it wins the next election, it‘ll provide every primary school pupil in england with a free school meal, by charging vat on private school fees. jeremy corbyn will say this morning that a labour government would invest in schools to ensure no child is held back because of their background. but the move has been criticised by the independent schools council, which claims the sums do not add up. pepsi has pulled its controversial new advert starring kendalljenner, after criticism that it was trying to commercialise protest movements like black lives matter. the company received thousands of complaints about the tone and the content of the advert, in whichjennerjoins a demonstration and gives a can of the soft drink to a police officer.
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pepsi says it was trying to project a "global message of unity, peace and understanding", and apologised for, in its words, "missing the mark". more at 10:30am. good more at10:30am. good morning. let‘s go straight back to the supreme court, and clive coleman. tell us about the significant ruling?m court, and clive coleman. tell us about the significant ruling? it is really significant because we know that parents hate the fact that if they take their children on holiday during the school holidays, they often have to pay for morford doing it because prices are higher. and so many parents like to take their children away for a week or two weeks during the school year during term time, to pay the reduced prices. this case has made that very, very difficult. what this case says this morning is basically you must obey the school rules, because
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it is an offence, a criminal offence, for a parent to fail to secure offence, for a parent to fail to secure the regular attendance of their child at school. that is what this case was all about. jon platt took his daughter out of school for a week. and in the courts below he could argue that even though he had done that, she was still attending school regularly. if you look at her attendance record over the course of attendance record over the course of a lengthy period, she had a very good attendance record, even with the holiday time taken out. it was more than 90%. therefore, he had not failed to secure a regular attendance at school. lady hale look that that this morning and she effectively rubbished that the fans. she said there were two interpretations of what regular attendance could mean. it could either mean sufficiently frequently, or it could mean in accordance with the school rules. she said it simply couldn‘t mean sufficiently frequently because that would give pa rents too frequently because that would give parents too much freedom to take
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their child out of school. if one child was taken out at one time and another at another, it causes mayhem within the school system. so what regular attendance must mean is that it is in accordance with the school rules. most schools will have a 100% attendance policy. the effect of thatis attendance policy. the effect of that is that parents will have to bite the bullet. they will have to pay for those more expensive holidays during the school holiday period. and if they don‘t and take their children out of school during term time, they will have to face the consequences, which are fines. if they fail to pay the fines, they will be prosecuted. in addition to that, john platt will have his case sent back to the magistrates court, where he will be found guilty of the offence unless he can come within one of three very limited statutory exceptions. and they really are simply whether the child was sick, whether there is a religious reason for the absence, or whether the
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child is sufficiently far from the school. i thinkjon platt is coming out. they have all been outstanding advocates and i cannot thank them enough for their work in this case over the last two years. karen wilkinson, who is here today, who campaigned on this issue for years, long before i got a penalty notice. thank you for your support and hard work. thank you for the people that is the people who sent messages of support and to the schoolteacher who has helped me help parents in the same situation. thank you to my family who have had to put up with two years of this because i was too stubborn to pay a penalty notice. my wife sally has had to but with this lunacy. as you alljust heard, he supreme court has just lunacy. as you alljust heard, he supreme court hasjust reversed decades ofjudicial supreme court hasjust reversed decades of judicial precedent. supreme court hasjust reversed decades ofjudicial precedent. they didn'tjust say decades ofjudicial precedent. they
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didn't just say the decades ofjudicial precedent. they didn'tjust say the high courtjudge who heard my case, lord jones, misinterpreted the law. they have concluded that the earlier high court decision from 2006, and one from 1969, were also wrong in their interpretation of the law and they should no longer be followed. be in no doubt, despite the judgment, i followed the law precisely, as laid down and interpreted by high court judges in two different cases from 69 and 2006. they told me that to attend regularly was to attend very frequently. so i decided not to pay a £60 penalty notice because my daughter had otherwise perfect attendance at school. the decision of those high courtjudges in 1969 and 2006 that decision. but here i stand outside the supreme court having just been told i was wrong to rely on the decision doubles high court judges, rely on the decision doubles high courtjudges, to guide me on law. with this judgment, those courtjudges, to guide me on law. with thisjudgment, those precedents have been swept away and the
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consequences can only be described as shocking. to attend regularly no longer means to attend frequently. it now means to attend on all the days and all the times that the school requires it, every un—authorised absence, including being a minute late to school, is now a criminal offence. if you share custody of your child, as i do, with a former partner, and they are linked to school holiday you don't have them, you are liable under a criminal offence. if you decide to keepa criminal offence. if you decide to keep a child of school for a day because you are their parent, you can no longer do that because if the head teacher second guess is you and marks it as unauthorised, you have committed a criminal offence. the issue is no longer if ever it was, but term time holidays. it is about the state taking the rights of parents away when it comes to making decisions about their children. many
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of you might have thought, given in 2015 when i took my family on this term time holiday, as i was at that time following the law as laid down by several high court judges, time following the law as laid down by several high courtjudges, that it would be grossly unfair to retrospectively criminalise me. that was very nearly not the case. what some of you in the press who have had the briefing this morning did not know, was that the first draft of this judgment was sent to the magistrates court with a direct instruction to conflict. there were not prepared to give me a trial. this case stopped at half—time because the magistrates said i had no case to answer. but the supreme court were prepared to send this back with a direction to convicted onto my barristers pointed out they could not do that. this case now has to go back to the isle of wight magistrates to start all over again. ican magistrates to start all over again. i can tell you, i have absolutely no intention of pleading guilty to this offe nce intention of pleading guilty to this offence when it goes back to the magistrates court. deterrence all over england i say this. the legal
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battle is now over. there is no right of appeal beyond this place. it will be a generation or more before this court revisits this decision, if ever it goes. you can no longer make a decision to take your child out of school, even for one morning, without the permission of the state. that does not mean this is the end of the matter. petitions have been signed by hundreds of thousands of parents, parliament has debated this issue multiple times and nothing has changed. so i would urge each and every parent and grandparents that finds the consequences of this judgment to be utterly shocking, as ido, to judgment to be utterly shocking, as i do, to vote on the 4th of may in the local elections. they are not being held everywhere in england but they are being held in a lot of places. vote to remove people like colin noble, the head of suffolk cou nty colin noble, the head of suffolk county council, the conservative leader of suffolk county council. they have issued more penalty notices than any other local authority in the country. i think
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parents need to say what they think about that on the 4th of may. if enough parents bothered to vote on the 4th of may and remove people who have been doing this, something will happen. something will change. the government will pass legislation to mitigate the effects of what is happening. jon platt there. he is clearly really cross about the ruling this morning. reaction from you. anita says public schools have more holiday than state schools and are not subject to the same regulations. ian says it is disgusting thatjon platt has lost his case. schools on the care because absence affects theirfunding. the care because absence affects their funding. declan says, the care because absence affects theirfunding. declan says, i would still rather pay a £200 fine than an extra £1000 on a holiday. and so it goes on. a few people taking a pop at teacher training days. let me introduce you tojon platt‘s lawyer.
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lee peckham, jon platt‘s lawyer. catherina scott—hart, who was fined for taking her children amelie and lewis out of school for four days. in middlesborough, dominique holding was fined £200 for taking her two children to see their relatives in turkey during the school term. and patsy kane, who is a firm believe in school fines and is the executive headteacher at three second schools in greater manchester. asjon as jon platt‘s asjon platt‘s lawyer, we could hear the —— clearly hear his passion, his angen the —— clearly hear his passion, his anger. he is going back to a magistrates court where he will plead not guilty. there will not be a trial in the crown court because it is not the kind of offence that the crown court hears. what is the point of him doing that? to be frank, i have not had a detailed discussion with him about his defence. i think lady hale has made it clear that the army as open to him the statutory defences. i think one of the defences he might be arguing is to do with the distance of the child to the school. that is not something outspoken in detail about. what is your reaction to his defeat? i wasn't surprised by losing
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the case, judging by how it went in the case, judging by how it went in the supreme court. my reaction is i suppose it gives certainty, so people know where they stand. one of lady hale‘s big points was that the law as it currently stands, or stood before this, was that magistrates would have to decide what was regular and what was not. the supreme court were anxious to find certainty. but i suppose the flip side of that now is that she has said that regularly means in accordance with the rules prescribed by the school. so any breach in attendance all those rules will mean that the parent has potentially committed an offence. dominic holding, now we have had this ruling, you have been fined in the past are taking your children out. would it stop you doing it ain? out. would it stop you doing it again? i have not taken them out since i got fined in the first place. it would depend on the cost ofa place. it would depend on the cost of a holiday, if i'm honest. rather than breaking the law? absolutely.
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who is to tell me what i can and can't do with my children? so if the holiday was cheap enough in term time, you would rather break the law and pay the £200 fine? absolutely. let me bring in patsy kane, would you said to dominic holden?” let me bring in patsy kane, would you said to dominic holden? i am absolutely delighted and pleased and feel supported that the state, in terms of the highest court in the land, has agreed that attendance at school is absolutely vital, and i‘m sure the vast majority of parents respect the work of schools, primaries and high schools, across the country, and are also very pleased that their work is respected, and it is valued. what would you say to dominique holding,
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doesn‘t matter what this ruling is, what she was to look at is the cost ofa what she was to look at is the cost of a holiday and if it is way cheaper in term time she will still ta ke cheaper in term time she will still take their children out of school? as educators we would talk and explain to parents by every single day in school matters. the curriculum has been extended and enriched, it is more challenging and every single day really does matter and a whole week out of school is several hours that you miss of your maths education, your english, science, primary schools have several hours of english and maths, they do that every single day, and you are missing whole lessons that that child will never get back. so this ruling protects the education of young children. dominique, how would you respond to patsy? the thing you are pointing out is the hours ina thing you are pointing out is the hours in a day that you school fees children, yet if i was to take my children, yet if i was to take my child out of school and home school my children, i am not required to school them for six, seven, my children, i am not required to schoolthem for six, seven, eight my children, i am not required to school them for six, seven, eight or nine hours a day for five days over
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40 weeks of the year, is it? so how can you justify a child sitting for six hours a day, schooling, compared to ifi six hours a day, schooling, compared to if i home—schooled, and scored for three hours a day? dominique, it is not a debate about home—schooling versus schooling in a traditional setting, it is about taking your children out of school to go to turkey. i understand that, but what the headmistress is saying is that if they miss a day in school, they have missed six hours of schooling, which completes their curriculum. but in my eyes, if i was the home—school my child, i don't have to be six hours a day, so why is it they can't still fit their curriculum in with five days out of the term for holidays? holidays themselves in their own right are
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educational visits. my children have been to many countries, they have been to many countries, they have been to many countries, they have been to turkey, egypt, greece, they have seen a lot of monuments and architecture, and a lot of history and a lot of cultural differences. why is that not education in itself? patsy kane, that is a good point.” am not against travel and visiting places of historical interest, it is great if you can afford that. schools are still doing their best to enrich the education. but the fa ct to enrich the education. but the fact is there are 13 weeks of holiday during the year. know, but the point is dominique can‘t afford to do that in school delays because it is so expensive. i would still argue that a trip every two years is better, and there are plenty of places fist oracle interest in this country that can easily be reached within 13 weeks holiday a year. not like going to the old ruins of pompeii, but i take your point.
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e—mailfrom jack, pompeii, but i take your point. e—mail from jack, brilliant judges, the father of charlton to think that he and only he was right by his actions take charge out of school without consultation or permission of the head. roger says it is the right decision by the supreme court. steve says the supreme court ruling means the holiday companies can continue to levy excessively high prices during the main summer holidays. i wonder ifjohn platt should not have taken the travel companies to court. i am not sure if he could have an action against the travel companies, that is not something we have discussed. what is really important to understand about this is that it is notjust about school holidays. it now says that attendance mean obeying the rules of what ever the school policy is. so importantly, and katarina who i was speaking tojust importantly, and katarina who i was speaking to just now, importantly, and katarina who i was speaking tojust now, there are lots of examples john has collated speaking tojust now, there are lots of examplesjohn has collated of people who have had half a day here and therefore things that most people might consider to be reasonable weatherhead is not
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authorised it and it has resulted in authorised it and it has resulted in a fixed penalty why prosecution. so probably it is a divisive issue but a lot of people might agree that a term time holiday is wrong but it becomes a different issue, family funerals for example, john has examples of those, where they travel for a funeral that has not been authorised. the issue goes far beyond the holidays. patsy kane, do you acknowledge that an unauthorised absence for a family funeral, being fined for that is crazy?” absence for a family funeral, being fined for that is crazy? i think there would be unusual. it is, but it has happened. it may have happened, that would be unusual. most headteachers would be compassionate, there are always circumstances that genuinely qualify as exceptional circumstances. schools and headteachers do have some flexibility in that. in my mind, most headteachers would probably consider that exceptional circumstances, so that would be a very small minority of cases. john
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platt also mentioned when talking outside the supreme court, he said if your child wakes up tomorrow and they are really tired, you can‘t as a parent make the decision to let them have the day off school unless you are prepared to break the law. do you think that is right? part of the responsible to your parents is ensuring that your child gets to bed ata ensuring that your child gets to bed at a reasonable hour so they are fit for school in the morning and they do have a good night‘s sleep. that isa do have a good night‘s sleep. that is a duty and responsible at the other parent. dominique, you are shaking your head and smiling, tell us why. whilst i am not against schooling and that children should be in school, mine are everyday, what makes me smile and laugh about thatis what makes me smile and laugh about that is once again that is somebody telling us how to parent our children. if we are the ones parenting our children, why can't we make the decision over where they go on holiday or when they go on holiday? and when they go to bed.
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thank you very much, all of you. thank you very much, all of you. thank you very much, all of you. thank you for coming on the programme, dominique, and patsy as well. lee peckham, thank you, john platt‘s lawyer. still to come before the end of the programme, we will be talking live to lutalo muhammad about how you bounce back from a massive disappointment, in his case what he considered to be a defeat, when he came within a second of gold medal at last‘s olympics. next, melissa cochrane and her husband kurt were both hit by khalid masood‘s car on westminster bridge. kurt was killed, melissa suffered a broken leg, broken ribs and a gash to the head. that day had been part of the trip of a lifetime, they‘d travelled from their home in utah through europe to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary. earlier this morning, i spoke with kurt‘s son, dallas, melissa is his stepmother. he says he does not hate khalid masood. he told me how they heard the news
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at home in salt lake city: i was home alone, and i got a text from my older brother, saying that my dad and melissa were involved in the london attacks. i got a few photos. so that was how i first found out. of course, it was unbelievable, i didn‘t really believe it at first, even after seeing the pictures, i mean, it was a heavy experience. it is still hard to ta ke a heavy experience. it is still hard to take in. we confirmed that it was them, and we were talking through my aunt, and they were in contact with my grandparents, and they kind of confirmed everything for us, sent us more photos, and that‘s how i found out. for most people, it's unimaginable to lose their dad in this way. how do you rationalise
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that? like i said, it is hard to rationalise. i still can‘t believe it is happening. it is so overwhelming, but i just it is happening. it is so overwhelming, but ijust tried to focus on the positive, and celebrate the time that i did have with my dad. tell our british audience a bit about your dad. my dad was the most loving, giving, humble guy you can come across. always a good time, a lwa ys come across. always a good time, always good hanging out with him, kids loved him. he always had a smile on his face, it was contagious, hejust smile on his face, it was contagious, he just have that contagious, he just have that contagious laugh. he is going to be missed. he always saw the good in everything. he knew the reason we
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are here isjust to enjoy everything. he knew the reason we are here is just to enjoy the pleasures of life, and i think that is what he passed on to me, and he has taught me that. that is how we kind of choose to live our life. he really is an amazing guy.” kind of choose to live our life. he really is an amazing guy. i want to play you something that your stepmum, melissa, said in an interview with the bbc last night. you may have heard it already but i just want to play this already, if i may. he was probably the most loving man i've ever met. no hate. just loved everyone. there wasjust man i've ever met. no hate. just loved everyone. there was just such loved everyone. there was just such love in his heart. and you can manage to do that yourself, not feel ill will to the man that has produced in this wheelchair, that has ended your future together with your husband ? has ended your future together with your husband? you‘re i don‘t think i could feel my injuries or might dyche myself as a person if i had hate in my heart, and kurt wouldn‘t wa nt hate in my heart, and kurt wouldn‘t want that either, so there is no hate. i can see that you are nodding
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in agreement with that. is that something you feel strongly?” in agreement with that. is that something you feel strongly? i feel very strongly about that, and that is exactly what my dad would want as well. just focus on the positive. there is no reason to hate anybody for this. that is not going to fix anything, it will not make anybody feel better. so just celebrate the times that you did have. have you thought about the man who did this? not really at all. i have seen little pictures here and there, but i have kind of chosen to avoid looking into whatever his story was. it is not going to help me any summer it is not going to help me any summer knowing who it was or why he did it. ijust want i just want to be there for my stepmum in her recovery to help her out the best i can, and just remember my dad for what he was, and just focus on that. you and your
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family are now trying to raise money for melissa, your dad‘s wife, your stepmum, because she is self—employed, isn‘t she? stepmum, because she is self-employed, isn't she? yes, her and my dad opened up the recording studios they have, built it up from the ground up, and were self—employed. just working out of our house. predictably, there have been some trolls online, accusing melissa of "faking her injuries" after a photo appeared at her smiling in hospital. how do you react to people who have suggested that? i honestly just react to people who have suggested that? i honestlyjust kind of choose to avoid that. there is a way is going to be trolls, as you say, there will always be negativity, but we choose to focus on the positive, and we are just super grateful for all the money that we have got, it has gone far beyond what we thought we we re has gone far beyond what we thought we were going to get. it has been
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amazing, all the help we have got from everybody. what has the response been like from people here in the uk, and in the states? when we we re in the uk, and in the states? when we were in london, it could not have been more accommodating. we were escorted everywhere, everything was sorted for us, we could not have been treated better. fear, the night it happened, the fbi was involved, got us on a plane immediately, got us to where we needed to be, our passports and everything. it could not have gone more smoothly. and i am very thankful for everybody that was involved. your stepmum attended the service of hope yesterday at westminster. do you know when she is going to be able to come home to you in salt lake city? we're not sure exactly. we‘ve been told hopefully
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within the week. but that is still on the fence, we are not positive exactly when, but we are optimistic and hoping that we can have her home safe soon. that was kurt cochran's son, dallas, talking to us earlier. still to come in the last half—hour of the programme. we‘ll be talking live to lutalo muhammad — about turning failure into success — after he came within a second of a gold medal at last years olympics. also, we will bring you details about the labour pledge on free school meals for state primary school meals for state primary school pupils, as their leader jeremy corbyn says he wants to make them available to all primary school kids in england. now with the news, here‘s reeta. in the last few minutes, the father who refused to pay a fine after taking his daughter out of school for an unauthorised holiday, has lost his case the supreme court. jon platt was fined when he took his daughter away for a week to florida during term—time.
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he refused to pay, because — he said — his daughter‘s attendance record was very good. the high court had originally ruled that the holiday did not constitute regular absenteeism — but this morning, the supreme court has overturned that judgment, saying that it‘s disruptive to children‘s education to take them out of school. this is how lady hale announced the ruling. unauthorised absences have a disruptive effect. not only on the education of the individual child, but also on the work of other pupils and of their teachers. if one pupil can be taken out whenever it suits the parent, then so can others. different pupils might be taken out at different times, multiplying the disruptive effect. any educational system expects people to keep the rules. not to do so is unfair to those obedient parents who do keep the rules, whatever the cost or inconvenience to themselves. in the last few minutes mr platt has been giving his reaction to the
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judgment. be in no doubt, despite the judgment, i followed the law precisely as laid down and interpreted by high courtjudges in two different cases from 69 and 2006. they told me that to attend regularly was to attend very frequently, so i decided not to pay a £60 penalty notice because my daughter had otherwise perfect attendance at school. the decision of those high courtjudges in 1969 and 2006 informed that decision, but here i stand having just been told i was wrong to rely on the decisions of those high courtjudges was wrong to rely on the decisions of those high court judges to guide me on the law. with thisjudgment, those precedents have been swept away and the consequences can only be described as shocking. to attend regularly no longer means to attend frequently. it now means to attend on all the days and that all the times that the school requires it.
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every unauthorised absence, including being a minute late to school, is now a criminal offence. the prime minister will meet the european council president, donald tusk, at downing street this lunchtime. they‘re expected to discuss the uk‘s exit from the european union — a week after mr tusk set out the eu‘s draft guidelines for the brexit negotiations. a mother who went missing with her two young sons has been found safe, police say. samantha baldwin was last seen with six—year—old dylan and nine—year—old louis in nottingham on the 27th of march. nottinghamshire police say all three have been found, and are with officers. labour says if it wins the next election, it‘ll provide every primary school pupil in england with a free school meal, by charging vat on private school fees. jeremy corbyn will say this morning that a labour government would invest in schools to ensure no child is held back because of their background. but the move has been criticised by the independent schools council, which claims the sums do not add up. pepsi has pulled its controversial new advert starring kendalljenner, after criticism that it was trying to commercialise protest movements
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like black lives matter. the company received thousands of complaints about the tone and the content of the advert, in whichjennerjoins a demonstration and gives a can of the soft drink to a police officer. pepsi says it was trying to project a "global message of unity, peace and understanding", and apologised for, in its words, "missing the mark". that is a summary of the latest news. join me at 11. thank you. thank you for your reaction to the ruling from the supreme court. linda says, i think parents have been penalised yet again. we already have to keep taking endless days of work for teacher training days. these should be during the school holidays. parents have little or no time with their children and should choose when and where to spend it. joseph says, we all know the real reason and if the holiday companies would stop ripping off hard—working
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pa rents, would stop ripping off hard—working parents, this problem wouldn‘t arise. there is no reason other than financial gain for the holiday firms to increase the price of trips during school holidays. another linda says if parents are not allowed to take their children on holiday during term time, why holidays organised by the school? susan says she was delighted with the ruling. so much school time for her children was disrupted by people taking their children out of town —— school during term time. setup with these selfish people who think their child is more important than everybody else‘s. now the sport. good morning. a busy night in the premier league last night. chelsea are a step closer to another premier league title after beating manchester city 2—1. they recovered from their shock defeat to crystal palace at the weekend and remain seven points clear of nearest rivals spurs. eden hazard was in great form, scoring his 15th and 16th goals of the season. manager
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antonio conte has been doing his songs. there are eight games to go. we must know that tottenham are going to win the games. and for this reason we need to take 18 points to mathematically win the title. spurs are the only team with any hope of catching chelsea. there were 1—0 down against swansea with two minutes left. three goals in six minutes left. three goals in six minutes gave them a 3—1win. meanwhile, the bottom of the table, a huge win for hull. they have climbed out of the relegation zone for the first time since october. they came from behind to beat relegation rivals middlesbrough. the body which represents referees has apologised after keith should —— keith stroud‘s eire last night when he failed to instruct newcastle to
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reta ke a he failed to instruct newcastle to retake a penalty against burton after pat —— players from both sides encroached into the penalty area. matt ritchie‘s spot kick went in but the referee wanly awarded burton a free kick instead of a retake, to the bemusement of the players. manager rafa benitez and 59,000 newcastle fans. ritchie had the final word on the night as his second—half goal gave newcastle the win which keeps them top of the championship. also last night, celtic‘s 1—1 jaw with partick thistle means they are 23 points ahead of aberdeen. the republic of ireland‘s women‘s team have reached an agreement with the governing body after allegations from players that they were not been treated properly. the team are threatened not to train if there were not improved support.
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after mediation talks, the fa i confirmed this morning that all issues have now been resolved and the players will resume training ahead of monday‘s game against slovakia. now he might be the world number one, and have won his last three tournaments, but dustin johnson‘s brilliant 2017 came to an abrupt halt yesterday. he fell down the stairs of his rented home near gloucester. the world number one injured his back and now could miss the masters, which starts later today. johnson is the favourite to win the green jacket on sunday and has been taking anti—inflammatory ta blets has been taking anti—inflammatory tablets in a bid to make his tee timejust after 7pm. a race tablets in a bid to make his tee time just after 7pm. a race against time. that is the sport. thank you. good morning. he was one second away from achieving his life‘s dream — winning a gold medal at the olympics — when it all went wrong. tae kwon do athlete lutalo muhammad was beaten in the most dramatic way in his olympic final last summer in rio. he was inconsolable, picking up silver instead. he broke down on tv
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and apologised to the nation. so how do you cope with failure, bounce back from such massive disappointment? lutalo‘s made a film exclusively with us as he comes to terms with life after rio. along the way he met people whose ‘failures‘ had been private, but for one very well—known person in particular — they‘d been very public. here is an extract. someone whose failures and successes have been left out in the public eye for decades is businessman lord sugar. who better to come to for advice on moving on? there was a time in the computer industry where we we re time in the computer industry where we were king of the computer market in europe and we made a bad range of products that had a technical fault on them. we struggled to understand what those technical faults were. and in that period of time, we dropped from the darlings of the computer industry, down to virtually zero. that was a very tough time. a
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very tough time. we went from making profits of £160 million a year to losses of 70 million. big bank debts and things like that. that was a very tough time. in my personal experience, i lost at the olympics in the last second. one of the ha rd est in the last second. one of the hardest thing to deal with was knowing the entire world was watching. in your experience, how do you overcome that? failure, something that went wrong, it is not a good thing. but it is factually correct. it wasn‘t a nice time but you have to deal with it. you can‘t deal with it by arguing against it or making excuses. it is factually right. we had a failure. i had a failure. and people talked about my failure. and people talked about my failure and all that stuff. but you
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have to move on until you get your next product in the marketplace, like our satellite dishes, and suddenly everything else was forgotten. did that criticism help you? it helped in the sense that you ta ke you? it helped in the sense that you take no notice of it. it is like the old thing, yesterday‘s newspaper, really. our cousins in america have got a new president. he doesn‘t seem to have learned that lesson. i‘m actually —— absolutely surprised about that. he seems to react to every bit of criticism that is thrown at him, whereas he shouldn‘t, really. it should be water off duck‘s back. really. it should be water off duck's back. all i have to do is win the medal and everything will be fo rg otte n ? the medal and everything will be forgotten? yeah exactly. and united do that. —— and you know how to do that. i have just spoken to lord sugar and
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what i have learned is that i can‘t focus on the outside noise, i can only focus on what i can control. and lutalojoins me now. good morning. good morning. how are you? really well. brilliance to be here. what did you want to get out of this film? a few things. a little bit of closure. two, i guess, finally close that chapter. it‘s such a big part of my life. i received so much exposure from it. to be able to move on and get —— and chased the next gold medal in tokyo. but also what it gave me that i probably didn‘t expect was a lot of perspective. speaking to people like lord sugar was an amazing experience. but also speaking to
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naomi and paloma, who have been through really, really ruff times. they didn‘t receive a sink —— silver medal as consolation for their perceived failure. i felt a lot of empathy for them. it makes me think about people should never think they are failures. you should always see the positive in every situation, but for some people that is harder than others. butterfat perspective is key. let me read you this e—mail. joshuais key. let me read you this e—mail. joshua is 23. he says, i wish to tell anybody watching that learning how to fail, learning how to fall, actually, has been my most painful and greatest lesson in my life so far. i‘m 23. my mum took her own life when i was 16 and i had to take a break from my studies.
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life when i was 16 and i had to take a breakfrom my studies. being the competitive person i was, ifelt i was a failure as i saw my peers go on to achieve the things i want to. but grief is a painful thing that you must work with and not against. healing time is essential. having slowly learned to stopping so harsh on myself and learning more about grief besides, ifeel on myself and learning more about grief besides, i feel that every setback i encounter has less of an effect on my progress. this is in part? to my being far less concerned with —— with what the world thinks about what i have not achieved, if indeed it really does think anything. iam indeed it really does think anything. i am now studying for a degree in physics at university, it isa degree in physics at university, it is a subject i‘m very passionate about. very moving. and he has been able to use adversity to go forward? wow. obviously what he has been through, i can‘t even imagine the pain. but the fact he has used it to come back and he is now doing well, he is now successful, i think it‘s
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brilliant. and i hope a lot of people watch this documentary and learn some stories, and they can understand that failure is not necessarily the end. i like what he says about healing time. it‘s natural to grieve. two must get it out of your system. but eventually time heals all wounds and you can move on from it. that was a really touching e—mail. move on from it. that was a really touching e-mail. what is making this film told you about yourself? it may not have told you anything. i‘m not asking for a profound answer. if there is one, go for it. i feel like i learnt... i really do think perspective is a big word. for me, speaking to people who i believe have gone through far worse things than i am, paloma‘s story about her young child. it really was quite
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touching. it makes me feel grateful for what i have there is a lot of empathy for what people have been through. i think people are too hard on themselves. when the ball have hit rock bottom, we as humans are naturally just a bit too rock bottom, we as humans are naturallyjust a bit too hard on ourselves. but then you look at lord sugar, and how his, how he responds to criticism, almost to ignore it. water off a duck‘s back and he keeps moving forward. that has been a crucial element to all the stories in this piece, that we have to keep on moving forward and be positive. the point he made about criticism, who cares what other people think? joshua has got a very wise head on young shoulders. lord sugar has had
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decades of experience, the ups and downs, in terms of business success and failures. it is kind of easy for him to say who cares what other people think because he is more mature. that is something we learn over time. these experiences are almost a necessary part of our growth that is how i see the olympics. every part of my career whether it was the bronze in london, the silver in rio, both of those medals at things around them. i have learned and beano to move forward from them. it has given me a lot of confidence that i have this experience. i feel like confidence that i have this experience. ifeel like i will be the oldest 29—year—old of the world when i go into tokyo because i had so much life experience. i am very sure because i will be the user to convert it into gold. i hope you do! i know i will. oh my gosh, i love
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the confidence lutalo, and thank you for making the film. next, labour leaderjeremy corbyn says he wants to extend free school meals to all primary school pupils in england and pay for it by taxing parents who send their children to private schools. let‘s get more on this with kelly price, who is at westminster. this is a big policy approach and not a cheap one either. —— policy pledge will stopjeremy corbyn wants all primary scored children to have access to free school meals, and he reckons about 90% of children in primary schools would take labour out of its offer, and it would cost about £900 million a year to pay for it, it would introduce vat on private school fees. they reckon that would raise about £1.5 billion a year. so those other sums. they reckon if this was a policy that was introduced it would increase attainment in primary schools but also it would boost healthy eating. this is what the shadow education
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secretary had to say about this. we know that would benefit all children, and it ends that stigma about the children that can afford and the children that cannot afford. it is about making sure every child is provided with a free school meal and a hotmail for that day, so it is and a hotmail for that day, so it is a really good socially progressive policy that is universal, for all those families that are working hard, paying their taxes, that want to see they get a benefit from that. those young people deserve just as much as all the other young people. i don't want it to be means tested, i think it is a really socially progressive policy. at the moment, all children in years one and two are eligible to have free school meals, and then if you are from a family that receives certain benefits, around 15% of pupils at primary schools in years three to six have access to free school meals too, so those are the numbers at the moment. it is interesting, the former head of ofsted sir michael will shaw so this is a difficult
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policy because really the money that could be going to poorerfamilies would be wasted essentially on those families that could afford free school meals. we have also heard from the independent school council that says this could be incredibly damaging to private schools too, and say it could force some smaller private schools out of business if some parents are to pay taxes on their fees. some parents are to pay taxes on theirfees. and some parents are to pay taxes on their fees. and others some parents are to pay taxes on theirfees. and others who some parents are to pay taxes on their fees. and others who say the numbers would not add we can now speak to mike buchanan, chair of the headmasters‘ and headmistresses‘ conference, ‘that‘s the professional association and to rachel, who is a working mother of two teenagers aged 14 and 17, and they both go to private schools. your reaction, rachel, but it will be the 80 on your fees that pay of this policy. i was shocked to
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hear that is a possibility, because we work very hard in order to send our kids. it is our choice to send our kids. it is our choice to send our kids. it is our choice to send our kids to private school. it is crippling to pay the fees, and an extra credits and would probably mean we have to rethink our decision. really? yeah. psephology said jeremy corbyn?” decision. really? yeah. psephology said jeremy corbyn? i think he needs to think again about the risk —— the redistribution of wealth. i am entirely in agreement that every child should be able to receive the school meals they are entitled to, but i just school meals they are entitled to, but ijust don‘t believe that it should be paid for by people who are struggling, who have made the choice but are struggling to send their pupils to private school. some people think that if you send your children to private school, you are kind of rolling in it. i think that is the impression people get. it is definitely not the case. there are
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those people who can afford, and can more than afford to send their children to private school, and there are those who choose to and make sacrifices to do so. what sacrifices have you and your husband made? we both work very hard, we don‘t go on an annual family holiday, we don‘t have new cars, we don‘t eat out, we have to make sacrifices like that in order to pay for the school fees, which we believe is edible food way of using our income. mike buchanan, how do you react to this pledge from the labour party? the it is full of dodgy maths and myths and misunderstanding. as rachel has said, it is unfair to parents who are already paying twice for private education. because they pay their taxes to pay for the state sector and then choose to send them to private schools. yes, and this would bea private schools. yes, and this would be a third payment they have to
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make. more importantly, the numbers just don't stack up. if you add 20% to the fees, most independent schools in this country have fewer than 400 pupil school that would cripple a school of that size and you would simply drive pupils into the state sector. a rough estimate on my way here would be the net cost to the state would be about £1 billion. right. what would be wrong in your view with driving your pa rents in your view with driving your parents and kids to the state sector is that it would not go to cope with it? if they were, they would have to build new schools, and that would be a huge capital cost. as well as of course paying for the extra places ona course paying for the extra places on a year by year basis. it will be very popular with some labour voters, because it appears to give free school meals to everybody at primary schools, including rich pa rents primary schools, including rich parents who stand their children to
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state schools. it also adds an extra cost to people who are perceived to be rolling in it. it is the perception that is a myth we have got to bust. rachel is a fairly typical independent school parent. i runa typical independent school parent. i run a school, 1000 children, most of my parents are just like rachel, two working parents, sometimes a single parent, not earning huge amounts, not in the other wealthy category. they would be crippled by adding 20% of their fees. rachel, go on. i was just agreeing. the principle of all children at state primaries getting free school meals, including those who can afford to pay for it, what do you think of that?” who can afford to pay for it, what do you think of that? i am entirely supportive of every child in this country getting a great education, and part of that is making sure they are well prepared for school, whether that is from breakfast clubs or free school meals at lunchtime acceptor, but it does seem rather
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order that the labour party is proposing on the one hand to penalised those who choose to send the child to a private school, and they have equated private education with wealth. there are wealthy people who are not using wealthy education. they have made that mistake. and of course they are giving that money back to people who don't need it. thank you both, thank you for coming on the programme. thank you to you, all of you, for your comments on changes to bereavement payments, which come in from today. any parent from today who loses their spouse or civil partner will be able to claim a maximum of 18 months of financial support, that is down from 20 years. but the initial lump sum you receive has gone up by £1500 from £2000 to £3500, and the payments over the 18 months will be tax—free and they will not affect any other benefits. the conservative peer baroness
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altman has been granted an urgent question in the house of lords on this issue today. she was on our programme on tuesday talking to alan, who has incurable cancer, and he was worried about what will his wife and two children be able to claim after he dies. can you confirm and explain what the significance of and explain what the significance of an urgent question is? well, every week there is a ballot for a question on something that has come up question on something that has come up urgently that week, and immediately after our interview on your programme on tuesday, i put my name down for that ballot with a question to ask the minister to come to the house and explain, or ask why, he might reconsider these cuts to support for bereaved families with children. and that question will be asked in about half an hour‘s time in the house. i also committed on the programme to
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getting a cross—party group from all sides of the house of lords to write to the minister to ask him to reconsider. we have written to the secretary of state. this is supported across the house of lords, to ask him to x end the period of support for families with children, if they are very. 18 months simply is not long enough for them —— if they are but you‘ve. for the children to have ended —— if they are bereaved. who is the minister thatis are bereaved. who is the minister that is coming to the lords to hear your urgent question? the minister todayis your urgent question? the minister today is lord henley, but we have written our letter actually to the secretary of state, damian green, and we are asking for an urgent meeting with him to see if we can get the department to reconsider these cuts, because what is the welfare state for? what is national insurance for, if it isn‘t to support children through such tragic
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circumstances? ok. thank you for coming back on the programme again. baroness altman is a conservative peen baroness altman is a conservative peer. we will continue to report on that issue. a couple of messages about lutalo muhammad and his film on how you react to failure or perceived failure. this one says lord sugar on your programme today isa lord sugar on your programme today is a breath of fresh air. perspective on failure is the key to success. this film has wriggled me thinking this morning. for me, lutalo‘s reaction at losing was what i would expect. when you see other sportsmen and women happily losing hands after ashun shaking hands after losing, they clearly did not wa nt after losing, they clearly did not want it enough. that said, people do not know how to deal with defeat. remember the higher you climb, the longer you fall, so be ready for it and good luck to lutalo muhammad in 2020. this one on facebook he was robbed, the clock had run out but the buzzer came late after it come i
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don‘t think that is true, lindsey. and sue on facebook, he was a gold medal winner in many people buzz maggaiz, including mine. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. good morning. a super start to the day for some of us. this was a recent weather watch picture sent in from weymouth in dorset. lovely sunrise first up we had a little bit of missed but that has cleared away. we have the clout again just toppling around that area of high pressure. even where we have the cloud cover it is bright enough at this time of year for it to be a decent enough day. where we see the sunshine lasting long list, 15 or
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16. light winds feeling very pleasa nt 16. light winds feeling very pleasant but the sun is strong, stronger than you would normally expect at this time of year. another touch of ground frost in the clear areas as we go through the night. chilly start on friday, otherwise a very similar picture, the best of the sunshine will be through the morning hours, then we will get a scattering of showers in the north and west for stock temperatures on a par today, this weekend. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11am: a father who refused to pay a fine
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after taking his daughter out of school for an unauthorised holiday has lost his case at the supreme court. to attend regularly no longer a means to attend frequently. it now means to attend frequently. it now means to attend all days and that all the all the time the school requires it. every unauthorised absence, including being one minute late to school, is now a criminal expense “— late to school, is now a criminal expense —— offence. there are growing signs of a major shift in american policy towards syria, after more than 70 people were killed in a suspected chemical attack on a rebel—held town. labour says it‘ll provide every primary school pupil in england with a free school meal, by charging vat on private school fees if it wins the next election. also: the prime minister will meet the european council president,

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